Sunday, 22 May 2016

Scenes from Long Day's Journey Into Night (written by Eugene O'Neill in 1942/43 and published in 1956), first performed in Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm Sweden, in 1956

Scenes from Long Day's Journey Into Night (written by Eugene O'Neill in 1942/43 and  published in 1956), first performed in Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm Sweden, in 1956. Jarl Kulle and Inga Tidblad and others starred in the play.

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“JamesTyrone - Lars Hanson, Mary Tyrone - Inga Tidblad, James Tyreone jr - Ulf Palme, Edmund Tyrone - Jarl Kulle, Cathleen - Catrin Westerlund”
“Looking ahead to Court Theatre’s production of Long Day’s Journey into Night, coming this March, today we are prompted to look back at the play’s very first opening, on February 2, 1956. Sixty years ago, on a chilly Thursday evening, the Royal Dramatic Theater presented Long Day’s Journey Into Night to its first ever audience—an audience requested specifically by the playwright himself. On his deathbed in 1953, Eugene O’Neill asked for his greatest admirers be the first to see his most personal, autobiographical play yet—and three years later, in a Swedish theater filled with Stockholmers, O’Neill’s most loyal fans gave his swan song its due. Swedes adored the new play and mourned O’Neill’s passing, calling him “the world's last dramatist of the stature of Aeschylus and Shakespeare." Some say Swedes saw O’Neill as one of their own, especially since the playwright freely admitted his great debt to their country and artists. Upon his acceptance of the Nobel Prize for literature in 1936,O’Neill said, "It was the reading of Strindberg in the winter of 1913-14which gave me the first version of what modern drama can be and the first impulse to write for the theatre myself." Needless to say, it seems O’Neill felt more appreciated by his Swedish fans than by American theatergoers. He gave the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm the play, free of royalties. While the audience was precisely to O’Neill’s taste, the timing of this posthumous premiere certainly was not. He had prohibited Random House from printing the script until 25 years after his death; against O’Neill’s wishes, this premiere was 22 years early.”
 

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