Tuesday, 31 May 2016

Reading of The Seagull written by Anton Chekhov, Moscow Art Theater actors, on May 7, 1899

Reading of The Seagull written by Anton Chekhov, at the Moscow Art Theater on May 7, 1899, photographed by Peter Pavlov
 
 
 

 
 
 


The Lower Depth, written by A. Maxim Gorky (1868-1936), starring Klesch & Krivoy Zob & VISHNEVSKY (Tatar) probably at the Moscow Art Theatre in 1902

Scenes from The Lower Depth, written by the Russian playwright, A. Maxim Gorky (1868-1936),
directed by Konstantin Stanislavski at  the Moscow Art Theatre in 1902 with Klesch & Krivoy Zob & VISHNEVSKY (Tatar) starred 
 











 
Klesch & Krivoy Zob & VISHNEVSKY (Tatar) 


Pepel & Natasha& & VISHNEVSKY (Tatar)



A scene from the Moscow Art Theater production of Maxim Gorky s play The Lower Depths staged by Konstantin Stanislavky
"The Lower Depths (На дне, Na dne, literally: 'At the bottom') is the best known of Maxim Gorky's plays. It was written during the winter of 1901 and the spring of 1902. Subtitled "Scenes from Russian Life," it depicted a group of impoverished Russians living in a shelter near the Volga. Produced by the Moscow Arts Theatre on December 18, 1902, Konstantin Stanislavski directed and starred."


At the Bottom by A. M. Gorky in Moscow, 1902



Ivan Moskvin and Vasily Kachalov in The Lower Depths (1902). Russian postcard, no. 8572. Photo: publicity still for the Moscow Art Theatre production of <i>The Lower Depths</i> (1902) by Maxim Gorky, with Ivan Moskvin as Luka and Vasili Kachalov as the Baron. Collection: Didier Hanson.:



Scence from At the Bottom (or The Lower Depth ) written by the Russian playwright, A. Maxim Gorky (1868-1936), starring Ivan Moskvin and Vasily Kachalov as the Baron probably at  the Moscow Art Theatre in 1902


Act III






File:The Lower Depths-World Premier Moscow 1902-02-Closing scene, act 3.png
The Lower Depths-World Premier Moscow 1902-02-Closing scene, act 3

Konstantin Stanislavsky in the role of Satin in Maxim Gorky’s “The Lower Depths” at the Moscow Art Theater, 1902

 

"During this same period Gorky began writing plays and formed close connections with the Moscow Art Theater, which in 1902 produced his most famous play, The Lower Depths. It shows the misery and utter hopelessness of the lives of people at the bottom of Russian society and at the same time examines the illusions by means of which many of the unfortunate people of this earth sustain themselves."

Brand written by Henrik Ibsen, directed by Nemirovich-Danchenko at the Moscow Art Theater in 1906

A scene from Brand written by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, probably directed by Nemirovich-Danchenko at the Moscow Art Theater in 1906
Vasily KACHALOV Russian DRAMA Actor - real name Shverubovich -

135135-KACHALOV-Russia-DRAMA-Theatre-ACTOR-Brand-PHOTO-vintage

"Another playwright whom Nemirovich-Danchenko championed was Henrik Ibsen. In the 1890s, while he was the drama instructor at the Moscow Philharmonic School, Nemirovich-Danchenko had been the first director to successfully stage Ibsen's work in Russia when he produced A Doll's House. Now, at the influential Moscow Art Theatre, he produced Ibsen's plays in succession: When We Dead Awaken in 1900, Pillars of Society in 1903, Brand in 1906, Rosmersholm in 1908, and Hedda Gabler."

Swedish Film Vem Domer with Tore Svennberg and Ivan Hedqvist, 1922

A scene from the Swedish Film Vem Domer with Tore Svennberg and Ivan Hedqvist, 1922. Director: Victor Sjöström Writers: Hjalmar Bergman, Victor Sjöström Olof Teodor "Tore" Svennberg (28 February 1858 – 8 May 1941) was a Swedish actor and theatre director whose career spanned more than five decades. Born in Stockholm, Tore Svennberg made his stage debut at the Folkan Theatre in his hometown in 1877.



Monday, 30 May 2016

Trifles (1916), written by Susan Gaspell (1876-1948) and performed in 1917

A Scene from Trifles (first published in 1916), written by the American playwright Susan Gaspell (Pulitzer-Prize winner 1876-1948) and performed in 1917

Original performance of Trifles, with Marjorie Vonnegut, Elinor M. Cox, John King, Arthur E. Hohl, and T.W. Gibson, from The Theatre, Jan. 1917
 
 
 

Trifles (1916), written by Susan Gaspell and performed at State College of Washington, Pullman, Washington in 1924

A Scene from Trifles (first published in 1916), written by the American playwright Susan Gaspell (Pulitzer-Prize winner 1876-1948) and performed at State College of Washington, Pullman, Washington, with the stage designed by Miss Hulda and executed by William Jackson in 1924




The Miracle (Das Mirakel 1911) written by the German playwright Karl Vollmöller and directed by Max Reinhardt at New York Century Theater in 1924

Scenes from The Miracle (Das Mirakel, first published in 1911) written by the German playwright Karl Vollmöller (1878-1948) and directed by Max Reinhardt at New York Century Theater in 1924














Bertram Park. [Diana, Viscountess Norwich (Lady Diana Cooper) as the Madonna in The Miracle] 1924

 





Visionary artist Norman Bel Geddes designed these costumes from the The Miracle. Bel Geddes also designed the scenery, which replicated a Cathedral and featured burning incense (original sketches were recently on exhibit in the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition Norman Bel Geddes: I Have Seen the Future). The Miracle was written by Max Reinhardt, who was a leading pioneer in the German Expressionist movement. The play was co-written by Karl Gustav Vollmöller, who also wrote the film Blue Angel (which launched Marlene Deitrich’s career). Diana, Viscountess Norwich, who played the statue Madonna, was one of the more famous socialites of her time, running in avant-garde circles with the “Lost Generation.”

"What eventually became the signature piece of the Salzburg Festival, Hofmannsthal’s Everyman, is particularly well represented, as is Goethe’s Faust and Goldoni’s A Servant of Two Masters. The best-known American productions are undoubtedly Karl Vollmoeller’s The Miracle, Weill/Werfel’s The Eternal Road, and Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, both in its stage and screen versions. Plays directed by close Reinhardt theater associates such as Heinz Herald, Felix Hollaender, Ernst Matray, and Richard Vallentin are also featured. Theatrical venues in both Europe and the United States are well represented."

"Der mehr als zwei Jahrzehnte anhaltende Erfolg seines „Mirakels“, eines sprachlosen und damit in jeder Sprache ohne Probleme verständlichen Theaterstücks, gab ihm recht. Zwischen 1911 und 1932 wurde das Mirakel weltweit vor einem Millionenpublikum aufgeführt, 1924 allein ein ganzes Jahr lang, Tag für Tag ununterbrochen am Broadway in New York. Die Musik zum „Mirakel“ komponierte Engelbert Humperdinck, nachdem Richard Strauss einen Rückzieher gemacht hatte."

"Visionary artist Norman Bel Geddes designed these costumes from the The Miracle. Bel Geddes also designed the scenery, which replicated a Cathedral and featured burning incense (original sketches were recently on exhibit in the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition Norman Bel Geddes: I Have Seen the Future). The Miracle was written by Max Reinhardt, who was a leading pioneer in the German Expressionist movement. The play was co-written by Karl Gustav Vollmöller, who also wrote the film Blue Angel (which launched Marlene Deitrich’s career). Diana, Viscountess Norwich, who played the statue Madonna, was one of the more famous socialites of her time, running in avant-garde circles with the “Lost Generation.”"

Sunday, 29 May 2016

Uncle Vanya (Дядя Ваня – Dyadya Vanya 1897) written by Anton Chekhov, having received its Moscow première in 1899 in a production by the Moscow Art Theatre under the direction of K. Stanislavski

 
 


Many scenes from Uncle Vanya (Дядя ВаняDyadya Vanya first published in 1897) written by the Russian playwright Anton Chekhov (1860-1906), having received its Moscow première in 1899 in a production by the Moscow Art Theatre under the direction of Konstantin Stanislavski

Enjoy the first night of Uncle Vanya, 1899, at the following You Tube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnFyZRKxxA8 .

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第1幕 マリーナ アーストルフ
The First Act

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第1幕 セレブリャーコフ

 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第1幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ
 
 
 
  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第1幕の幕切れ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第1幕 ヴォイニーツキイ  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 ヴィシニェーフスキー(ワーニャ伯父さん[ヴォイニーツキイ])

Serebryakov (Aleksandr Leonidovich Vishnvsky)
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 マリーナ


『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕の幕開き
The Second Act, Opening
  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 アーストロフ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 アーストロフ



  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 ソーニャ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 アーストロフ 
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ


『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第2幕 ソーニャ




 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ
The Third Act
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ
 
  

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 アーストロフ
  












『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ
 
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 ヴォイニーツキイ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第3幕 セレブリャーコフ




  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 リーリナ(ソーニャ) サマロヴァ(マリーナ) 1911

Sonya (Liliana Stanislavsky) &
Tlegin “Waffles” (Alexandre Artem)
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 アーストロフ
  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 ヴォイニーツキイ『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 セレブリャーコフ  


『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 テレーギン
The Fourth Act
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 アーストロフ

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 セレブリャーコフ


『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 セレブリャーコフ

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 ヴォイニーツキイ

『ワーニャ伯父さん』 第4幕 ヴォイニーツキイ





Final Moments of the Fourth Act
 
  
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 ルーシンスキー(セレブリャーコフ)
Serebryakov (V.V. Luzhsky) 1905?
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 ペトローヴァ(ソーニャ)
Sonya (V. A. Petrova) 1905?
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 クニッペル(エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ)
クニッペル(エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ)
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 クニッペル(エレーナ・アンドレーヴナ)

Helena (Olga Knipper)
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 ヴィシニェーフスキー(ヴォイニーツキイ)

Serebryakov (Aleksandr Leonidovich Vishnvsky)
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 アルチェム(テルーギン)1911

Tlegin “Waffles” (Alexandre Artem)
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 サマロヴァ(マリーナ)

Marina (Maria Samarova)
 
『ワーニャ伯父さん』 ラエフスカヤ(マリヤ・ワシーリエヴナ)『ワーニャ伯父さん』 レミャローヴァ(マリーナ)
レミャローヴァ(マリーナ)

ラエフスカヤ(マリヤ・ワシーリエヴナ)