Friday, 30 September 2016

The Playboy of the Western World (1907) written by John Millington Synge and produced at the Theatre Dada, Prague, in 1928

Two scenes from The Playboy of the Western World (first published in 1907) written by the Irish playwright John Millington Synge (1871-1909) and produced at the Theatre Dada, Prague, Czech,
by Divadlo Dada and directed by Jiří Frejka in 1928





When The Playboy of the Wester World was first performed in Ireland it caused a huge controversy, with riots in the streets. Prague was one of the first other cities where it was performed. But it didn’t cause a scandal here, did it?
“No, not really. The main issue with the original production concerned the authenticity of the representation of the nation, which obviously was not an issue here in Prague and the Czech Lands whatsoever. No one really minded the various ways that the Irish may be depicted in this play. The next production in 1928 by Divadlo Dada – the Theatre Dada – directed by Jiří Frejka, was totally avant garde and really successful and actually started a tradition of staging the play here – as one of the very, very popular plays.”

Thursday, 29 September 2016

The Well of the Saints (first produced in 1905) written by John Millington Synge and painted by John S. Currie

A stage sketch of The Well of the Saints (first produced in 1905) written by the Irish playwright John Millington Synge (1871-1909) and painted by John S. Currie (American 1897-1946)





Wednesday, 28 September 2016

The Shadow of the Glen (1903) written by John Millington Synge (1871-1909) and produced by the Mount Vernon Community Players, Ohio, USA, around 1920

A scene from The Shadow of the Glen (first published in 1903) written by the Irish playwright John Millington Synge (1871-1909) and produced by the Mount Vernon Community Players, Ohio, USA, around 1920




Riders to the Sea (1904) written by John Millington Synge and produced at the West Virginia University, USA, around 1920

A scene from Riders to the Sea (first published in 1904) written by the Irish playwright John Millington Synge (1871-1909) and produced at the West Virginia University, USA, around 1920


The Land of Heart’s Desire (1894) written by William Butler Yeats and produced at the Campus? Playhouse, USA, in 1920

A scene from The Land of Heart’s Desire (first published in 1894) written by the Irish playwright William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) and produced at the Campus? Playhouse, USA, in 1920



Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Cathleen ni Houlihan written by the Irish playwright William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) and Lady Gregory, and produced at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, on April 2, 1902

A scene from Cathleen ni Houlihan (the nationalistic and republican play) written by the Irish playwright William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) and Lady Gregory, and produced at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, for the first time on April 2, 1902

 
 
 
 
 

 
"Yeats devoted significant creative energy to writing plays. He worked with playwright Lady Gregory to develop works for the Irish stage, the two collaborating for the 1902 production of Cathleen Ni Houlihan. More works soon followed, including On Baile's Strand, Deirdre and At the Hawk's Well."
  
"1902 April The one-act Cathleen ni Houlihan, written mostly by Lady Gregory but credited publicly to Yeats, is performed in Dublin on the same bill as George William Russell’s (“Æ”’s) full-length Deirdre by the Irish National Dramatic Company, formed by William G. and Frank Fay. The presentation is a notable first: the plays were written by Irishmen, performed by Irish actors, and directed by Irishmen. After the union of the Fays with Yeats and Lady Gregory of the now-defunct Irish Literary Theatre, the group is renamed the Irish National Theatre Society. Through mid-1904, the INTS will present eight series of performances, with plays by a variety of Irish writers in its repertory.
The public reaction to the political implications of Cathleen ni Houlihan (billed as Kathleen . . .) leads Yeats to reflect, “Did that play of mine send out / Certain men the English shot?” The portrayal of a spirit-of-Ireland figure luring a peasant family’s son away to fight for her—and the fact that a notorious agitator against British rule in Ireland, Maud Gonne, played the role of Cathleen—caused the play to be received more as a political incitement than a work of dramatic art. Yeats had announced in the United Irishman that his subject is "Ireland and its struggle for independence," but at an inquiry into a possible violation of the theatre's patent, he defends the play against the charge that it was meant as political propaganda. "I took a piece of human life, thoughts that men had felt, hopes they had died for, and I put this into what I believe to be a sincere dramatic form. I have never written a play to advocate any kind of opinion and I think that such a play would be necessarily bad art. . . . At the same time I feel that I have no right to exclude, for myself and for others, any of the passionate material of drama."
October
In the second number of Samhain Yeats replies to Martyn’s contention (in United Irishman) that actors should train themselves for “the modern drama of society” rather than “plays of heroic life or plays like Cathleen ni Houlihan, with its speech of the countrypeople”: “Our movement is a return to the people, . . . and the drama of society would but magnify a condition of life which the countryman and the artisan could but copy to their hurt. The play that is to give them a quite natural pleasure should tell them either of their own life, or of that life of poetry where every man can see his own image, because there alone does human nature escape from arbitrary conditions. . . . We should, of course, play every kind of good play about Ireland that we can get, but romantic and historical plays, and plays about the life of artisans and countrypeople, are the best worth getting. In time, I think, we can make the poetical play a living dramatic form again, and the training our actors will get from plays of country life, with its unchanging outline, its abundant speech, its extravagance of thought, will help establish a school of imaginative acting.” "

Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel (1921) written by Jean Cocteau and produced by the Ballets Suedois on June 15, 1921

A scene from Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel (first published in 1921) written by the French playwright Jean Cocteau (1889-1963) and produced by the Ballets Suedois on June 15, 1921







"Les mariés de la tour Eiffel (The Wedding Party on the Eiffel Tower) is a ballet to a libretto by Jean Cocteau, choreography by Jean Börlin, set by Irène Lagut, costumes by Jean Hugo, and music by five members of Les SixGeorges Auric, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc and Germaine Tailleferre. The score calls for two narrators. The ballet was first performed in Paris in 1921."

"Un mois après, le 18 juin 1921 sont montés de nouveau au théâtres des Champs-Elysées, Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel (ou La Noce massacrée), petit chef-d'oeuvre littéraire, où Cocteau parviendra à faire aboutir dans les personnages de l'appareil-photo et du phonographe, son obsession des "boîtes-parlantes" narrant l'action. (Divers manuscrits du texte original font apparaître Radiguet et Auric comme co-auteurs du texte...)"

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

La Mort de Tintagiles (1894) written by Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949) and produced at the Opéra Comique, Paris in 1902

Five scenes from La Mort de Tintagiles (published in 1894) written by the Belgian playwright Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949) and produced at  the Opéra ComiqueParis in 1902

Act 1

Act 2

Act 3

Act 3

Act 4

 
 
 


Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Five scenes from Pelléas and Mélisande (published in 1892) written by the Belgian playwright Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949)  and produced at the théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin, Paris, in November 1905


act 1, scene 2
 
act 2, scene 1


act 2, scene 3

act 3, scene 4

act 4, scene 4

Sunday, 18 September 2016

Voulez-vous jouer avec moâ? (1922) written by Marcel Achard and produced at the Théâtre de l'Atelier, Paris, on 18 December, 1923

Two scenes from Voulez-vous jouer avec moâ? (first published in 1922) written  by the French playwright Marcel Achard (1899-1974) and produced at the Théâtre de l'Atelier, Paris, on 18 December, 1923




"Voulez-vous jouer avec moâ ? est une pièce de théâtre de Marcel Achard, créée au Théâtre de l'Atelier le 18 décembre 1923."

  • Mise en scène : Charles Dullin

  • Personnages et distribution :
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    Thursday, 15 September 2016

    Knock (1923) written by Jules Romains and produced at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, on December 14, 1923


    A scene from Knock (first published in 1923) written by the French playwright Jules Romains (1885-1972) and produced at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, on December 14, 1923



     

    "Knock (French title: Knock ou le Triomphe de la médecine) is a French satire written in 1923 by Jules Romains. The play was presented for the first time in Paris at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on December 15, 1923, in a production starring Louis Jouvet."

    Wednesday, 14 September 2016

    Le Carnaval des enfants written by Saint-Georges de Bouhélier and directed by Pitef? at the Théâtre des Arts, Paris, in 1910

    A scene from the play Le Carnaval des enfants written by the French playwright Saint-Georges de Bouhélier (1876-1947) and directed by Pitef? at the Théâtre des Arts, Paris, in 1910


     
    "Il obtint son plus grand succès avec Le Carnaval des enfants, pièce créée au Théâtre des Arts en 1910, et jouée par la suite à l'Odéon et à la Comédie-Française."

    Tuesday, 13 September 2016

    The first act from L'Homme enchaîné (3 acts) written by Édouard Bourdet and produced at the Théâtre Fémina, 6 March, 1923

    A scene of the first act from L'Homme enchaîné (3 acts, first published in 1923) written by the French playwright Édouard Bourdet (1887-1945) and produced at the Théâtre Fémina, 6 March, 1923


    Friday, 2 September 2016

    The second act of the play 'Love' written by the French playwright Jerardi??, and produced at La Comédie-Française in Decembr 4th,1921

    A scene from the second act of the play 'Love' written by the French playwright Jerardi??, and  produced at La Comédie-Française in Decembr 4th,1921